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HOLI is known as the festival of colors. It is celebrated on the day of the Purnima in early March every year. It is the celebration of the arrival of Spring and marks the re-kindling of the spirit of life according to the Bhagvad Gita. Holi is a day to celebrate with friends and neighbors.

The history of the origin of Holi goes back to Hindu mythology when Bhagwan Krishna killed the demon "Madhu" in ancient Braj (Mathura). Bonfires are lit on street to cleanse the air of evil spirits and bad vibes, and to symbolize the destruction of the wicked "Holika", for whom the festival was named. Holi is probably the most colourful and joyous of all festivals.

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In most regions of India, Holi celebrates the joyful leelas of Bhagwan Krishna and gopis. At Mathura and Vrindavan, Holi is celebrated with great joy for many days, as these were the places where Bhagwan Krishna spent most of his childhood.

People throng the temples to get drenched with coloured water, and consider it a blessing from God. In Maharashtra and Gujarat, a grand procession of men soaked with coloured water walks through the streets shouting Govinda Aala Re. People throw colored powder and colored water on each other. In different parts of India the festival celebrates with music, song, dance, and some boisterous scenes around the temples.



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